SILENCE! #290

February 28th, 2021

I ASKED THE ICE, IT WOULD NOT SAY BUT ONLY CRACKED OR MOVED AWAY

Daddy, I don’t want to write the blurb.
But you said you wanted to write the blurb.
I don’t want to write the blurb. I want to play with the train track.
Okay, I’ll set up the train track for you… There you go.
Daddy I don’t want to play with the train track.
But I just made the train track for you.
But I don’t want to play with the train track!
What do you want to do, then?
I want to write the blurb.

We said it would happen and here it is! SILENCE! 290!

<ITEM>Gary Lactus and The Beast Must Die kick off this momentous recording with some of the finest chat on Earth, forged in the white hot heat of aimlessness then cooled in the pure waters of lockdown boredom then tempered with the hammer of pointlessness on the anvil of stretched metaphors. That is to say, they talk about John Cooper Clarke’s autobiography, I Wanna Be Yours, the Stan Lee biography, True Believer, Richard Herring’s Ball, King Rocker and Birds Of Prey.  Oh, and they totally forget to mention any sponsors but do remember to plug their new, Patreon-only podcast, Dan and Fraser’s Starlight Adventures!

<ITEM>BANG! AAAAARGH! Gary opens a Lorne Bomb!

<ITEM>Come with us to Reviewniverse, with Deadline, Keif Llama: Vectors, Huntress, Kraven The Last Hunt, Si Spencer and Grave Horticulture of course!

<ITEM>Listening time!


@frasergeesin
@thebeastmustdie

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This edition of SILENCE! is proudly sponsored by the greatest comics shop on the planet, DAVE’S COMICS of Brighton. It’s also sponsored the greatest comics shop on the planet GOSH! Comics of London.

 

3 Responses to “SILENCE! #290”

  1. Nick Says:

    No, Frank Wynne was the final editor for Deadline, after Si Spencer. The publisher and owner was Tom Astor. According to his Wikipedia page, Wynne is now an award winning translator of modern French literature, which is… somehow not what I was expecting to read when I went looking for him! Still, it’s nice in a way to see a post-comics career be that successful.

    I only started reading Deadline about five issues before it was cancelled; as far as I know, that was because of the failure of the Tank Girl movie. At 16 it was my first exposure to the British small press, so even without Tank Girl, I’ll always treasure it for that. Think I found some of the earliest issues in a comic shop, and then tracked down the remaining missing issues in my early twenties after university. Goodness, to see what some of them might be worth now!

  2. Gary Lactus Says:

    Thank you for the info. That little step up for small press that Deadline provided is sorely missed.

  3. Nick Says:

    You’re absolutely right. And it was on sale in WHSmiths too I think, not just comics shops.

    I can still remember those little capsule reviews in Comics International would review what sounded like captivating comics, but you had to make the effort to mail them, plus have the required funds. I suppose the internet makes it easier now, but it also feels like there’s lots of work from the British small press of the 80s and 90s which is now lost to view.

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